Fatoumata Diawara – Ivory Coast via Mali with lots of influence

The latest album to arrive with me is one of those gems that I find myself driven to writing about and sharing with all the readers of this blog. Fatoumata is (at the time of writing) a 30 year rising star of world music. Her singing is a mix of Malian grooves, some more reminiscent of the earlier tracks on Rokia Troure’s difficult to find album release “Mouneissa”. Other tracks give a sense of New Mali, as exported by current artists such as Vieux Farka Toure and Toumani Diabate, with energetic grooves (check Sowa and Bakonoba (the video is featured on this page). Which label managed to capture this rising star and do a fantastic job getting it down onto recorded media for us all? World Circuit of course, protecting and storing the cultural heritage of modern world music. You can find the album “Fatou” online through Amazon, or other world music specialists.

Ali and Toumani – their finest collaboration

I’ve just bought an album that has to go down as one of the most spectacular of the year, and it’s been carried off by two of my favourite artists: Ali Farka Toure and Toumani Diabate. But you’re probably asking the question, how can Ali return from the grave to record an album? Well, this was his very last, recorded while he was suffering in his final days. For those familiar with these two virtuoso’s prior collaboration, In the Heart of the Moon which was released in 2004, this final recording session was made the following year, but clearly the release has been held back for an opportune moment.

I’m not sure quite how to express the impact that these two artists have had on my musical awakening. Toumani with the Kora, and Ali Farka Toure with his guitar. I think the fact that I do not understand the language being sung (on Ali’s other albums) creates a further distance between me and the artist. I’ve always been an instrumentalist, liking moods and passages creates by sounds and noise over lyrics trying to tell me a story.

The two albums are subtly different. With the former Toumani’s playing features much more strongly, the Kora has more attitude and takes a greater centre stage. It was Toumani’s first major performance on the international stage and Ali gave the protege the chance to shine. Since that first release Toumani has gone on to produce a further 3 albums and has appeared on numerous collaborative projects.

In ‘Ali and Tomani’ they are one. Even if just 12 months seperate the recording there is a perfect harmony and balance between the instruments. The Kora is less aggressive and blends seamlessly with Ali’s playing. For me, track of the album has to be “Soumbou Ya Ya”. It’s just pure Ali and Toumani sharing the love of their instruments. Not since Ali teamed up with Ry Cooder (‘Talking Timbuktu’) has there been such competiting collaboration.

Rest in peace Ali, you went out on the highest plateau.

Best of Bonga – Angola rocks the house

Angolan Legend Bonga
Angolan Legend Bonga

Since the 1970s Angola’s Bonga has featured prominently in the nations music and this is yet another epic slab to hit the World Music scene drawing on performances and works that span his 30 year career. For me Portuguese is one of the most interesting of all languages for music to be sung in, there is just something about its pronunciation and intonation that makes it fabulously interesting to listen to.  If you enjoy the sounds of Sara Tavares, Myra Andrade (who’s new album Storia Storia will soon be reviewed here too) or, the melodies of Madagascar’s Modeste, you’ll find that the Best of Bonga will sit comfortably in your collection.

Pickup a copy of the CD from Amazon here


Arabo-Muslim…the Great River tradition

afelbocoum

If something sounds familiar about Afel Bocoum’s sound, you only have to look at who tutored him for clues. A member of Ali Farka Touré’s “ASCO” group from the age of 13, provides all the evidence one would need to pin the artist to the groove, but he’s grown beyond that and gone on to become a star in his own right.

Afel’s first album, Alkibar, was released ten years ago and it remains one of my favourite of all time. He describes his playing style as “Arabo-Muslim…in the Great River tradition” and this was certainly a sentiment captured on first album which meandered through the daily activities of life on the Niger river.

In the ten year period since the first release, Afel has collaborated on a number of music projects, most notably Ali Farka Touré’s last album, Savanne.

In Tabital Pulaaku, Afel takes us on a much broader musical journey. He still remains firmly within the African blues genre, but listeners of Tinariwen, Ba Cissoko and Viex Farka Touré are going to enjoy this album, as it’s much more accessible to the new African blues converts, when seen alongside the earlier work.

Melodies and harmonies across the instruments are much more defined in Tabital Pulaaku, and the album transmits a warm energy and timelessness that is, for me, a fundamental component of a successful African blues album.

One of the best tracks on the album is not surprisingly the title track, Tapital Pulaaku. In this we hear Afel’s distinctive voice pushed front stage, and then around the one and a half minute mark, a shift in tempo that reveals a head-bobbing groove, delivering all the expression and relief that African music provides to its fans.

This is an album to be savoured and enjoyed like a fine wine.

Take some African blues now

Asa Started a Fire on the Mountain

asaBorn in Paris but with Lagos, Nigeria, called home since the age of two, comes Asa (pronounced Asha), an artist with an album so refined, you’d think it was her greatest hits, but it’s not, it’s in fact her first! She’s been given a huge amount of profile on the World music circuit, but that alone is not deserving of the attention this artist should be receiving, as she’s a talent of subliminal quality.

A voice that harks back to the days of Tracey Chapman, but combines this with the dryness and subtlety of Tanita Tikaram is just the opening images this artist conjures on a first listen to her album. The first track ‘Jailer’ has the bassline and uproaring goodness of a track by the late Bob Marley. With Reggae, souful and acapella grooves, this is album that lifts the soul and takes you to better place.

Tracks such as ‘360degrees’ offer more by the way of reflection for listener, while the acapella on ‘Subway’ will just make you stop whatever you’re doing to enjoy it. The most airplay has been laid on the track ‘Fire on the mountain’, but it’s not a representative sample of this artists calibre and dynamism.

You need to go and buy this album!

Introducing the Kora’s top 5 albums

Following our earlier post on the Kora,  let’s now open ourselves up to its fabulous World. [If you’re on the posts page, you can start YouTube video on the right for some Kora background music.]

I’m going to begin with a dedication to the Gambian artist responsible for introducing me to the Kora, his name, Basiru Suso. His album, ‘Suso Kunda’, was for me an epic journey, it shares a timelessness in the same way that Bach’s Brandenburg Concertos do. I don’t think the album was ever commercially released, save for those few copies on display in London’s Leicester Square, but I’m sure he’d be only to happy to answer any enquiries you might have about his music. Basiru’s music is very much free from additives, you get the Kora, and perhaps a plucked bass as backing, and that’s about it, which is just what Kora diehards tend to enjoy the most.

To arrive at Basiru or the more traditional forms of Kora playing, you’ll first need a gentle introduction or you might get scared off. There are usually musical bridges that one comes across moving from one musical style to another.

For example, I arrived at the Kora via this route,
70s Funk -> House Music -> Drum and Bass -> Reggae -> Dub -> African Blues -> Kora

Because everyone’s music history is different, to try and propose an exact starting point is always going to be difficult. So I’ll review the albums here, I think act best as musical bridges, and hope that you identify one that matches your own personal music history.

heartofthemoonAli Farka Touré & Tomani Diabaté – ‘In the Heart of the Moon’
As I type out the name of this album I smile. Ali was the original African bluesman and Toumani shows he can work the Kora like no other. In the Hotel Mande, overlooking the Niger River these two legends came together and recorded one of the singularly most inspired recordings in music history. It’s just pure talent improvising, enjoying and sharing a fusion of guitar and Kora, like no other.  It’s 12 tracks of sublime relaxation, reflection and positivity. You buy this CD because if you’re the type of person that likes to be sent on a journey when listening to music, and it’s because of that, that you have a great music system for hearing it. The recording does not disappoint.

I don’t know if I can actually beat that opener but I’m going to try…

boulevardindependenceToumani Diabaté’s Symmetric Orchestra
The year following the release of ‘In the Heart of the Moon’, Toumani stepped up to the stage with his Symmetric Orchestra to show that, apart from being able to sound mellow, the Kora could also rock just as hard the discotheque. The album is a fusion of funk, and other urban rhythms born out of 10 years of Friday night jam sessions in Bamako’s Hogon Club. It’s what makes the album a much more upbeat and energized affaire then the calming ‘In the Heart of the Moon’. Toumani shares with us songs that cover a complete range of styles, from the slower, ‘Mali Sadio’, which tells the story of a Hippopotamus that drinks from a lake, through to knee bouncing grooves, sweeping backing vocals, and Toumani’s electric Kora playing (as heard on the track, ‘Single’).

bacissokoBa Cissoko – Electric Griot Land
What happens when you plug the Kora into guitar effects boxes? The answer lies with Ba Cissoko, who’ve done just this. This album makes the use of background sounds, and other forms of artificial noise to add great depth and better imagery to their music. The group also performed as support act for Femi Kuti, so their skills are noted at the highest levels. I’m recommending the earlier of their two albums as this is the stronger of the two offerings.
When you take a track like ‘Silani’, on which K’Naan also collaborated, you’ve got to ask why such an album and such talent can’t get high profile on the international stage.

3ma3Ma – Rajery, Ballake Sissoko and Driss El Maloumi
A collaboration between a Madagascan, Malian, and Moroccan provides the cultural context for this cross-border collaboration which that brings together this trio of musicians each armed with their country’s national instrument. Driss brings the Arab lute, Rajery the Valiha (a bamboo tubular zither) and our friend Ballake, the jaw dropping Kora. It’s around the four minute mark of the opening track, ‘Anfass’, that you hear the first fruits born of this beautiful fusion of cultures played out by these very gifted musicians.

tchamantcheRokia Traoré – Tchamantché
As we are building a list of ‘bridging albums’, I’m including an artist in the list that does not actually play the Kora. However, the Kora features so poignantly on her latest album, that I’m including it as it will no doubt encourage listeners of classical and jazz to be brought closer to the Kora. The twist of the Kora in this album is in its combination with Rokia’s voice – always one to bring a cold chill and edginess to her performance that will send shivers down your spine. If you liked Miles Davis’s Bitches Brew back in the 1960s, you’re going to like this one too.

So that ends our introduction to the Kora. I urge you to pick one of the albums above, take a small financial risk and dive in, this is a music you need to hear.

If you’d like to comment on any of the albums featured in this post, please leave your thoughts below for others in the TT community. Remember you can also subscribe to updates of the Tolerant Traveler using Twitter, RSS or the newsletter, meaning you’ll know as soon as a new post is published.