Konkani Songs: Music From Goa made in Bombay

The world knows Indian music, but Konkani songs are truly unique with a blend of many musical facets. It is western music and yet it is still Indian – true soul music that touches your heart. This compilation contains 22 tracks of the finest the genre had to offer in the 50’s and 60’s, including tracks from Alfred Rose, Lorna, Chris, Perry, Robin Vaz, and many more.

Konkani Songs: Music From Goa made in Bombay

Introducing the Kora’s top 5 albums

Following our earlier post on the Kora,  let’s now open ourselves up to its fabulous World. [If you’re on the posts page, you can start YouTube video on the right for some Kora background music.]

I’m going to begin with a dedication to the Gambian artist responsible for introducing me to the Kora, his name, Basiru Suso. His album, ‘Suso Kunda’, was for me an epic journey, it shares a timelessness in the same way that Bach’s Brandenburg Concertos do. I don’t think the album was ever commercially released, save for those few copies on display in London’s Leicester Square, but I’m sure he’d be only to happy to answer any enquiries you might have about his music. Basiru’s music is very much free from additives, you get the Kora, and perhaps a plucked bass as backing, and that’s about it, which is just what Kora diehards tend to enjoy the most.

To arrive at Basiru or the more traditional forms of Kora playing, you’ll first need a gentle introduction or you might get scared off. There are usually musical bridges that one comes across moving from one musical style to another.

For example, I arrived at the Kora via this route,
70s Funk -> House Music -> Drum and Bass -> Reggae -> Dub -> African Blues -> Kora

Because everyone’s music history is different, to try and propose an exact starting point is always going to be difficult. So I’ll review the albums here, I think act best as musical bridges, and hope that you identify one that matches your own personal music history.

heartofthemoonAli Farka Touré & Tomani Diabaté – ‘In the Heart of the Moon’
As I type out the name of this album I smile. Ali was the original African bluesman and Toumani shows he can work the Kora like no other. In the Hotel Mande, overlooking the Niger River these two legends came together and recorded one of the singularly most inspired recordings in music history. It’s just pure talent improvising, enjoying and sharing a fusion of guitar and Kora, like no other.  It’s 12 tracks of sublime relaxation, reflection and positivity. You buy this CD because if you’re the type of person that likes to be sent on a journey when listening to music, and it’s because of that, that you have a great music system for hearing it. The recording does not disappoint.

I don’t know if I can actually beat that opener but I’m going to try…

boulevardindependenceToumani Diabaté’s Symmetric Orchestra
The year following the release of ‘In the Heart of the Moon’, Toumani stepped up to the stage with his Symmetric Orchestra to show that, apart from being able to sound mellow, the Kora could also rock just as hard the discotheque. The album is a fusion of funk, and other urban rhythms born out of 10 years of Friday night jam sessions in Bamako’s Hogon Club. It’s what makes the album a much more upbeat and energized affaire then the calming ‘In the Heart of the Moon’. Toumani shares with us songs that cover a complete range of styles, from the slower, ‘Mali Sadio’, which tells the story of a Hippopotamus that drinks from a lake, through to knee bouncing grooves, sweeping backing vocals, and Toumani’s electric Kora playing (as heard on the track, ‘Single’).

bacissokoBa Cissoko – Electric Griot Land
What happens when you plug the Kora into guitar effects boxes? The answer lies with Ba Cissoko, who’ve done just this. This album makes the use of background sounds, and other forms of artificial noise to add great depth and better imagery to their music. The group also performed as support act for Femi Kuti, so their skills are noted at the highest levels. I’m recommending the earlier of their two albums as this is the stronger of the two offerings.
When you take a track like ‘Silani’, on which K’Naan also collaborated, you’ve got to ask why such an album and such talent can’t get high profile on the international stage.

3ma3Ma – Rajery, Ballake Sissoko and Driss El Maloumi
A collaboration between a Madagascan, Malian, and Moroccan provides the cultural context for this cross-border collaboration which that brings together this trio of musicians each armed with their country’s national instrument. Driss brings the Arab lute, Rajery the Valiha (a bamboo tubular zither) and our friend Ballake, the jaw dropping Kora. It’s around the four minute mark of the opening track, ‘Anfass’, that you hear the first fruits born of this beautiful fusion of cultures played out by these very gifted musicians.

tchamantcheRokia Traoré – Tchamantché
As we are building a list of ‘bridging albums’, I’m including an artist in the list that does not actually play the Kora. However, the Kora features so poignantly on her latest album, that I’m including it as it will no doubt encourage listeners of classical and jazz to be brought closer to the Kora. The twist of the Kora in this album is in its combination with Rokia’s voice – always one to bring a cold chill and edginess to her performance that will send shivers down your spine. If you liked Miles Davis’s Bitches Brew back in the 1960s, you’re going to like this one too.

So that ends our introduction to the Kora. I urge you to pick one of the albums above, take a small financial risk and dive in, this is a music you need to hear.

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Baaba Maal’s Television – tuned in?

televisionIf you’re reading this post asking yourself who’s Baaba Maal, this is going to be one of your best days in a long time, because we’re about to open your world to an artist that has been dazzling audiences in Senegal for more than 20 years. His latest release, ‘Television‘, is his 11th album in this distinguished career.

Baaba Maal was born in the town of Podor, in the Nigerian region of Senegal. He sings in Pulaar, the language of the Fila ethnic group that, as well as Senegal, can also be found in Benin, Guinea, Niger and Somalia. While the Cora is the traditional instrument for musicians of West Africa (most recently elaborated by the gifted Toumana Diabate), Baaba Maal broke whit tradition and took up playing the guitar.

In part his education at the Beaux Arts in Paris has been responsible for exposing Baaba Maal to Western music and composition, but its also because he is a phenomenally gifted musician that has always sought collaborations and ideas to cross-pollinate his music – after returning from Paris Baaba Maal studied with Mansour Seck, who exposed him to traditional composition, while his 1994 release ‘Firin in Fouta’ brought together ragga, salsa and the Breton harp!

To his latest album now, and if it weren’t Baaba Maal’s unmistakable voice, you’d have great difficulty placing the title track ‘Television’ anywhere at all in Africa because it’s so devoid of African instrumentation. In fact, a consistent theme in this album is its lack of traditional instrumentation. However, due to Baaba Maal’s musical heritage and experience he pulls this off in an amazing way.

This album is an expression of what the music of Senegal could sound like if there was more focus on electronic, instead of traditional instruments. Those seeking the comfort of more traditional sounds will find it in “Tino Quando”, the last track on the album that features a beautiful and simple guitar melody and vocals from Baaba Maal accompanied by backing singers in Italian.

Expect to see a few DJ’s remixing this album as it’s ripe for it.

For more information and purchase options, click here.

Rebetiko – Greece’s urban sound

imambaildiImam Baildi, literally the Imam Fainted, is a dish traditionally prepared with aubergines, and involves cooking it over a flame until it can take no more!. It’s the name that both Orestis Falireas and Lysandrop Falireas have given to a music project that sees Greece’s urban music genre Rebetiko, catapulted into the 21st century. They’ve done to Rebetiko what Gotan Project’s did to Argentinian Tango, and in the process evolved the genre as we know it.

Tracks such as ‘De Thelo Pia Na Xanarthis’ leap out, starting with Cuban All Stars style of introduction, before kicking in with a funky beat and spidery guitar. A couple of tracks could probably have been dropped from the album to make it as awe inspiring as some of stronger performances the CD contains. A positive effect of this CD will be to expose audiences to a tucked away genre in Greece’s music history, and it’s certainly had that effect on me, I want to learn more about Rebetiko, thanks guys.

This album is currently only available for purchase in Europe or in specialist stores in the US.